Top ADSR VST Plugins
Top ADSR VST Plugins

Top 4+ ADSR VST Plugins 2021

We have created for you a rating of the Best 4 ADSR VST Plugins as the most downloaded and according to the excellent reviews of musicians

VST list navigation:

  1. ADSR Sample Manager
  2. Hexcel
  3. Simple Scratch
  4. MIDI Grid

1. ADSR Sample Manager

By: ADSR
 
ADSR Sample Manager
 

Updated to version 1.6

The optimal starting point for every production session, ADSR Sample Manager makes organizing, finding and auditioning samples refreshingly simple.

The most effective way to access all your samples at once, ADSR Sample Manager keeps your project in the flow. Work in standalone or keep all the action right in your DAW with the plugin. Search all your local samples or your purchased ADSR samples in the cloud by type, genre, bpm or key. Best of all… it’s FREE!

ADSR Sample Manager features

  • Expand your library – Browse a near-unlimited library of sounds
  • Find sounds with similar tags
  • Automatically tags all your samples in a flash
  • All your samples (local or cloud) searchable in an instant
  • Standalone or VST/AU/AAX
  • Hear samples in the context of your music with MIDI input
  • Sync key and BPM to preview samples in context
  • ADSR Account integration – browse your purchased samples in the cloud, preview in real time and download what you need.
  • Ableton LINK – sync your loops and one-shots with others using multiple devices running Link-enabled software / mobile apps
  • Tag by sound type, genre or label
  • Detect duplicate samples
  • Drag samples directly into your project (raw or processed)
  • Key detection and transpose to key
  • Use multiple instances directly in your project
  • Loops sync to your project tempo
  • Quantised start points
  • Trim sample start and end points
  • Play samples forward, reverse or ping pong
  • Order by sample info : type, key, bpm, tag, length, file size and date 
  • Save your favourite sounds and searches
  • Use with services like Splice, Noiiz and Loopcloud
  • Instant inspiration with the random button
  • Unlock your sample library and find the perfect sound

Ever gotten half way through a track and wished you’d tried a different sound? Do you feel like half your production time is lost to sorting through sample folders and files? Do you even really know what sounds you actually have in your current sample library?

Forget empty promises made at midnight that one day you’re going to clean up your hard drive. Download ADSR Sample Manager – it’s free and it works.

New in ADSR Sample Manager 1.6

Expand your library

Discover a near-unlimited library of sounds. All locked to your projects tempo and in key.

Enjoy the freedom to pay as you go – no subscription

Recently added features in ADSR Sample Manager

  • Sample manipulation controls: HP/LP filters, fade in and out, gain, normalize and meter
  • Zoom waveform with snapping for start / end points (zero crossing and note division)
  • Looped previews with quantized start points
  • Ableton LINK enabled – Join the same network and sync your loops and one-shots with others using multiple devices running Link-enabled software / mobile apps
  • ADSR Account Integration: login and browse your purchased sample packs. Search and preview samples from the cloud like you would your local library. Listen in sync with your track (key/bpm) – download everything or just what you need.
  • New sample info columns: length, file size and date added, with the ability to show/hide what you need.
  • New genre and label tag types. Find the right sound at the right time.
  • Dragging into your DAW renders the sample with all of your selected settings (fades, tempo etc) or drag the raw sample by user choice
  • Midi mappable controls; random/random back, filters, fades, gain
  • AAX Support
  • Duplicate sample detection with hide duplicate function
  • Resizeable waveform display (drag up and down to resize) with added retina support
  • Collapsible left panel and reduced minimum size allowed
  • Various performance improvements and bug fixes

2. Hexcel

By: ADSR
 
Hexcel
 
Hexcel is a generative MIDI sequencer based upon the harmonic table, specifically designed for creating semi-random patterns based upon user input.

The user has direct control of the amount of randomness in any given sequence. Hexcel can work with any synth that accepts MIDI input.

The main part of Hexcel’s interface consists of a hexagonal grid, using the harmonic table. Each cell within the grid can be set to one of several functionalities.

The function of a cell is determined by it’s color:

Green cells generate ‘active nodes’ in one of several ways – either upon starting the MIDI clock, or at a user-specified tempo, or triggered directly by the user pressing a button. Active nodes are generated with a direction, and they travel across the hexagonal grid in that direction.

Yellow cells are used to trigger MIDI notes. Each cell has a MIDI note that it is associated with, and that note will play whenever an active node comes into contact with a cell that has been set to yellow.

Orange cells are used to reverse the direction of any active node that crosses it.

Red cells delete any active node that comes into contact with it.

Grey nodes can be used to re-direct active nodes in a randomized fashion. Each cell has 6 buttons surrounding it – these can be turned on or off by clicking on the outer region of the hexagon. A grey cell with all of it’s buttons turned off will do nothing. However, if one or more buttons is turned on, any active node will choose one of those buttons at random and move in that direction. These are therefore quite versatile as they can be used to automatically re-direct any active node into a desired direction (by only turning on one of the buttons) or into a completely randomized direction (by turning on all 6 buttons).

Finally, there are some controls on the right-hand side of the screen that allows the user to control the speed that the sequencer runs at, how often new active nodes are generated from Green cells, and so on. The ‘CLEAR’ button at the bottom allows the user to delete all active nodes if things get too chaotic.

As a MIDI generator, Hexcel does not create sound on it’s own – the MIDI data needs to be sent to an appropriate synth. This can be achieved either directly in Reaktor or using Reaktor in a DAW such as Ableton Live.


3. Simple Scratch

By: ADSR
 
Simple Scratch
 

Using Simple Scratch is easy – to begin, load in a sample in the top of the GUI. You can drag and drop a sample from the file browser built into Reaktor, or from your operating system.

Set the starting point for your sample by clicking on the area you want the playback to begin at.

Next, draw in sequences in the areas directly beneath the file loader.

The top sequencer controls the speed that the sample plays back at – the top of the graph is playing forward as fast as possible, the bottom of the graph is playing in reverse, and the middle is not playing at all.

The bottom sequencer controls the amplitude of the sample.

By modulating the amplitude and the speed of the sample at the same time, you are creating a similar effect to a vinyl scratch, using the same general principals.

No real effort has been extended to mimic the actual sound of vinyl, but there can sometimes be an uncanny similarity nonetheless.

Up to 8 sequences can be stored with your sample. These sequences can be recalled using the MIDI notes between C2-C3 (white keys only).

Please Note: Reaktor Player will not work.


4. MIDI Grid

By: ADSR
 
MIDI Grid
 

MIDI Grid is a generative MIDI sequencer that can create evolving patterns in a chosen key and scale. MIDI Grid will work with any synth that accepts MIDI input. Requires Reaktor 6.3.

The bulk of MIDI Grid’s interface is a simple 8×8 grid.

Each square in the grid can have one of three basic types: dead, alive, or buffer.

Click on any square to change it’s type.

Dead squares don’t do anything, and they appear as an empty square on the interface. These should make up the majority of the grid.

Alive squares move in a direction, and they appear as an arrow pointing in that direction on the interface. Whenever they run into the edge of the grid, another alive square, or a buffer square, they change direction. Alive squares also trigger MIDI notes whenever they hit the edge of the grid. There are controls to the left of and above the grid that select which notes are triggered when this happens.

Buffer squares simply sit still and wait for alive squares to bump into them. They appear purple on the interface.

The key to creating a nice, evolving, patch in MIDI Grid is to set things up so that you have a few alive squares and buffer squares that will bump into each other as sequencer advances.

The collisions will cause the squares to change direction, which will cause the MIDI output to morph over time.

It is this that will add an element of randomness to your system (if you set your grid up so that no collisions occur between squares, it will never evolve at all).

To the right of the grid, there are controls for the key and scale, the speed of the sequencer, the length of the generated notes, and velocity. When changing key and scale, the changes made will be harmonically informed – you will always change to a key or scale that is harmonically adjacent to the one you just left.

As a MIDI generator, MIDI Grid does not create any sound on it’s own. You must route the MIDI data to the synth of your choice.

In the video provided, an example is shown using Ableton Live. While the exact method may differ slightly from DAW to DAW, it should be very similar in your program of choice.

Write your review and rate this rating The Best 4 ADSR VST Plugins

Top ADSR VST Plugins
Top 4+ ADSR VST Plugins 2021
SOUND QUALITY
96
VALUE FOR MONEY
94
EASE OF USE
95
FEATURES
93
PRESETS
97
Reader Rating0 Votes
0
95

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