Top Delay Tutorials
Top Delay Tutorials

Top 13+ Delay Tutorials 2022

We have created for you a rating of the Best 13 Delay Tutorials as the most viewed and by excellent reviews of musicians

Tutorials list navigation:

  1. Multitude – Delay Workstation
  2. D16 Tekturon Delay – Introduction & Overview
  3. Simple LFO Space Delay in NI Massive
  4. Stacking Delays to Create a Lush Guitar Effect
  5. Trick For Better Sounding Delay FX
  6. Building a Reaktor Delay Effect
  7. Reverse Delays How To
  8. D16 Tekturon Delay – Product Showcase
  9. Sidechaining Delays
  10. Learn How To Use The Synced Delay In Massive
  11. Creating dub delays with Ableton Live
  12. Filter Delay Effects Chains with Fabfilter Timeless 2
  13. Build an Echo Delay Effect in Reaktor

1. Multitude – Delay Workstation

A conventional delay constantly processes and echoes all of the audio on the input. Multitude uses gate sequencers to control sends into four individual delay lines – allowing you to activate them at precise moments in time. Want a delay only on that particular note, chord, or hit? With Multitude, you can do this. And so much more.


2. D16 Tekturon Delay – Introduction & Overview

Tekturon is a multitap-delay effect with 16 independent, high-quality delay lines. What really sets it apart from other, similar products, however, is the way it’s controlled and the unique topology into which the taps are arranged: The Delay Matrix.

In fact, Tekuron can’t be thought of as a tap-delay effect in the strictest sense, but more of a sequence of taps equally delayed from each other, whereby working with the plugin strongly resembles using a step sequencer. This rather unusual design should give your creativity just the kick it needs!

Inspired by Ergonomics

Each and every aspect of the plugin’s workflow is presented in a visually clear and intuitive way, allowing for quick and precise control of every facet of the device, as well as the ability to easily tame all 16 delay lines it contains with global controls.

The ability to visually grasp the entire layout with minimal effort allows you to achieve even the most complex results with extraordinary speed.

Fully-featured delay lines

Despite the imposed, fixed topology, each of the 16 delay lines has its own independent set of parameters providing complete control over:

  • Delay loop
  • Panning
  • Stereo spread
  • Post-tap multi-mode filter

Despite its superficially simple appearance, in the right hands Tekturon can be a very powerful production tool, indeed!

Quick-access mute buttons

You’ll certainly appreciate these for live performance situations, among others: conveniently placed, always accessible, and MIDI-assignable mute buttons for selectively suppressing individual delay lines. Invigorate your arrangements, bring some life to your production, and have fun!

Two-tiered Control

Tekturon provides the ability to control some aspects of the processing globally (adjusting parameters of all 16 delay lines at once) or locally (individually per delay line), thus making it possible to exert both fine-grained and convenient, ‘one-knob’ control over your performance!

Key features

  • 16 delay lines arranged in a sequence of taps equally delayed from each other
    • Quick-access Mute buttons for selectively suppressing lines’ outputs
    • Globally controlled (all 16 delay lines at once):

    ▪ Time grid – The delay between subsequent taps and base delay time for all 16 feedback loops
    ▪ Optional host tempo synchronization
    ▪ Feedback base value
    ▪ Shuffle (swing)
    ▪ Master filter’s settings

    • Locally (per delay line):

    ▪ Feedback relative to base value
    ▪ Delay time as multiple of Time grid
    ▪ Local filter’s settings
    ▪ Stereo Panorama
    ▪ Stereo Spread
    ▪ Output volume with level indication

  • Ultra-low digital aliasing output
  • Tag based preset browser
  • MIDI-learn functionality
  • 64bit internal processing

3. Simple LFO Space Delay in NI Massive

Often times it is the most simple of procedures that result in the coolest sounds, like this awesome simulated delay effect made possible by LFO modulation.

There are a lot of people out there who will argue that there is nothing original in music, and even audio production for that matter, because they feel that new innovations in sound are actually just doing something that was already done years ago just with a different tool. Here is a shining example of that kind of thing in action. We all know that a simple delay is a nice effect to add to a sound to add some development and interest to a project. We also know that NI Massive only gives us a couple of FX slots to work with on any given instrument we create with it. Now, of course, we can turn to our DAW for any added effects that are unavailable to us within Massive, but there is sometimes a need to add an effect into the original sound. So here is a great way to achieve some delay/echo like effects through the use of an LFO.

A big thanks to YouTube user wwwJoJoGocom goes out again for yet another simple and clearly presented tutorial that is useful for most users out there. As you can see in the video it’s quite easy to do, really. Generate any sound, extent the amp envelope’s release a bit apply a filter and modulate the cutoff with an LFO controller set to generate a square wave and sync the rate to your get your desired effect.

If you are interested in learning more tricks like this one, you can request something specific by leaving a comment below or sending a message our way. Thanks for stopping by!

Cheers,
ΩhmLab


4. Stacking Delays to Create a Lush Guitar Effect

A video on stacking delays with similar time settings to create a lush effect on electric guitar.


5. Trick For Better Sounding Delay FX

In this video, Echo Sound Works shows you how to use delay while still keeping important elements in the mix, like lead vocals or synths, up front.


6. Building a Reaktor Delay Effect

This video tutorial shows how to create a simple Reaktor Delay Effect that can be used as part of an instrument or as a Reaktor Effect!

Evan Sutton, Senior Sound Design Instructor at Dubspot, demonstrates how to create a delay effect using NI’s Reaktor. This Reaktor Delay Effect is a complex setup that can be used as part of a built-in instrument, or as an Reaktor Ensemble effect in your favorite DAW.

Start the Reaktor Delay Effect by creating a New Effect. Inside the New Effect, add a Single Delay Module, a Saturator Module, a Math – Multiply/Add Module, and a Crossfade Module. Create a Control for the Single Delay, and entitle it Delay. This will be the control for the Delay Time. Next, create a Control for the Math module module, and entitle it Feedback. As the name implies, this will control the amount of Feedback. Lastly, create a control for the Crossfade module and title it Dry/Wet. The Dry/Wet will control the mix of our unprocessed signal (dry) and out processed signal (wet).

Connect the input of Channel 1 (Left) to both the 0 0 of the Crossfade Module and to the input of the Math Module. Connect the Crossfade Module to the Output of Channel 1. Connect the output of Single Delay Module to both the 0 1 of the Crossfade Module and to the input of the Saturator Module. Connect the Output of the Saturator Module to the input of the Math Module and run the Output of the Math Module into the In of the Single Delay Module. Clone everything in the setup, minus the Controls, for Channel 2 (Right). Set the each Control to control both the matching modules on each Channel. The connections of the Reaktor Delay are fairly complicated, but if you follow the video carefully everything the Reaktor Delay should work just fine.


7. Reverse Delays How To

In this video, Echo Sound Works shows you how to create custom reverse delays in any DAW using a simple reverse function.

This is a great tip and trick to fill out a mix or make a brand new, interesting sound.


8. D16 Tekturon Delay – Product Showcase

Tekturon is a multitap-delay effect with 16 independent, high-quality delay lines. What really sets it apart from other, similar products, however, is the way it’s controlled and the unique topology into which the taps are arranged: The Delay Matrix.

In fact, Tekuron can’t be thought of as a tap-delay effect in the strictest sense, but more of a sequence of taps equally delayed from each other, whereby working with the plugin strongly resembles using a step sequencer. This rather unusual design should give your creativity just the kick it needs!

Inspired by Ergonomics

Each and every aspect of the plugin’s workflow is presented in a visually clear and intuitive way, allowing for quick and precise control of every facet of the device, as well as the ability to easily tame all 16 delay lines it contains with global controls.

The ability to visually grasp the entire layout with minimal effort allows you to achieve even the most complex results with extraordinary speed.

Fully-featured delay lines

Despite the imposed, fixed topology, each of the 16 delay lines has its own independent set of parameters providing complete control over:

  • Delay loop
  • Panning
  • Stereo spread
  • Post-tap multi-mode filter

Despite its superficially simple appearance, in the right hands Tekturon can be a very powerful production tool, indeed!

Quick-access mute buttons

You’ll certainly appreciate these for live performance situations, among others: conveniently placed, always accessible, and MIDI-assignable mute buttons for selectively suppressing individual delay lines. Invigorate your arrangements, bring some life to your production, and have fun!

Two-tiered Control

Tekturon provides the ability to control some aspects of the processing globally (adjusting parameters of all 16 delay lines at once) or locally (individually per delay line), thus making it possible to exert both fine-grained and convenient, ‘one-knob’ control over your performance!

Key features

  • 16 delay lines arranged in a sequence of taps equally delayed from each other
    • Quick-access Mute buttons for selectively suppressing lines’ outputs
    • Globally controlled (all 16 delay lines at once):

    ▪ Time grid – The delay between subsequent taps and base delay time for all 16 feedback loops
    ▪ Optional host tempo synchronization
    ▪ Feedback base value
    ▪ Shuffle (swing)
    ▪ Master filter’s settings

    • Locally (per delay line):

    ▪ Feedback relative to base value
    ▪ Delay time as multiple of Time grid
    ▪ Local filter’s settings
    ▪ Stereo Panorama
    ▪ Stereo Spread
    ▪ Output volume with level indication

  • Ultra-low digital aliasing output
  • Tag based preset browser
  • MIDI-learn functionality
  • 64bit internal processing

9. Sidechaining Delays

In this video, Echo Sound Works shows you a great tip and trick to make delays on a vocal or lead sound a bit more musical. Side chain isn’t just for the kick and the bass!


10. Learn How To Use The Synced Delay In Massive

In this tutorial, learn how to use the synced delay in Massive to create unique delay effects like ping pong and gated delays.

Using the delay in Massive is a great way to take your sounds to the next level and save processing power by staying inside of Massive. The synced delay in Massive can be a very powerful sound design tool.

There are two types of delays you can load up in the master effects section in Massive. They are delay and delay synced (or synced delay). The delay in Massive is a fairly basic stereo delay that gives you control over the dry/wet, damp and left and right delay times. The damp knob is essentially a low pass cutoff filter that only controls the sound of the delayed signal. The damp control becomes a very important part of the delay because it allows you to reintroduce any of the clarity lost by using the delay in the first place. Any spatial effect has a tendency to mud up a sound so that damp control is helpful!

Overall, the delay in Massive is best suited for opening up your sounds by adding some space and slap delay. It’s great on basses! But it’s not the most powerful delay in terms of feedback amounts and its overall flexibility. More advanced delay types are better suited for the synced delay in Massive.

The synced delay is a powerful effect. You get control over dry/wet, damp, feedback and the ratios of the feedback. You can quickly dial in various delay types like slap back, stereo ping pong delays and even more unique types like gated delays. One of my favorite ratios for lead sounds is having 1/4 and then 1/8 because it creates a great stereo ping pong delay.

Cheers,

Echo Sound Works


11. Creating dub delays with Ableton Live

In this Ableton Live Sound Design Quick Tip, PB instructor Dan Herbert shows you how to create infinite feedback loops in Ableton.


12. Filter Delay Effects Chains with Fabfilter Timeless 2

In this tutorial, learn how to build filter delay effects chains with Maschine’s macros, built in effects, and a dedicated VST, Fabfilter Timeless 2.

In this tutorial, macro mapping for effects chains is covered.

Using Machine’s ability to map parameters to macros, we can control the critical parameters of both plugins with just Maschine’s eight encoders. This allows us to precisely control our filter delay effects chain, even in a live setting.

After exploring the extremes of the filter delay effects chain we created with Maschine’s built-in plugins, using a dedicated VST, Fabfilter Timeless 2, is covered. Timeless 2 integrates both delays and filters, which is perfect for our filter delay macros. Timeless 2 also has much more powerful and flexible modulation sources, as well as a number of different filter designs.

Repeating the macro mapping process we can also control the more powerful Timeless plugin with just 8 encoders mapped to important parameters. This filter delay effects chain is one example of Maschine’s powerful sound design and flexible mapping abilities.

Make sure to subscribe to us on YouTube for all of our Maschine tutorials.


13. Build an Echo Delay Effect in Reaktor

This tutorial demonstrates how you can create a seriously powerful NI Reaktor Echo Delay Effect!

In this original video tutorial, Salamanderanagram fulfills the request of a community member who wanted to know how to recreate the Echo Delay Effect available in the FL Studio DAW. Instead of recreating the exact effect, Salamanderanagram created a similar device that became a beast of its own! This is one of the videos that came from our collection of past member videos. If you would like to receive other great tutorials like these, please sign up o receive our free member-only tutorials.

This Echo Delay Effect gives the user complete control over pitch, number of taps, delay amount, panning, and character. It can even run in ping pong mode! This is a powerful and flexible delay that would be a gem in any audio effect arsenal.

This tutorial is not for the faint of heart. Depending on your experience level, you can expect this Echo Delay Effect to take anywhere from 15-30 minutes to build. If you find that you are having difficulty with this Reaktor effect, or if you just need help, feel free to ask or comment in the forums and we’ll try to assist you as best as we can.


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Top Delay Tutorials
Top 13+ Delay Tutorials 2022
SOUND QUALITY
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