Top Kontakt Tutorials
Top Kontakt Tutorials

Top 20+ Kontakt Tutorials 2022

We have created for you a rating of the Best 20 Kontakt Tutorials as the most viewed and by excellent reviews of musicians

Tutorials list navigation:

  1. Live – Using Polyscape Pro to Create Next Level Liquid D&B!
  2. Ceres – Celestial Voices from Auddict
  3. Using Modulation To Control Volume In Kontakt
  4. Automating Kontakt in Logic Pro X Using Smart Controls
  5. Creating Key and Velocity Crossfades in Kontakt
  6. Optimize Kontakt DFD
  7. Mapping multiple samples and instruments to the keyboard in Kontakt 5
  8. Articulations in Kontakt
  9. Wavesfactory Mercury – First Look
  10. Sonic Zest – The Complete Collection – Kontakt Library
  11. Route a Group To An Aux Channel Using The Gainer Module
  12. KINETIC TREATS – Kontakt Libraries
  13. Wavesfactory Suspended Cymbals
  14. Output Analog Brass & Winds – First Look
  15. Tips on Using and Optimizing The Database In Kontakt
  16. Indiginus Solid State Symphony
  17. Use Zone Envelopes To Modulate Zone Parameters in Kontakt
  18. Using The Aux Channel To Add Reverb To An Instrument
  19. Maschine + Kontakt : Live Pitch Shifting
  20. Automation With Kontakt

1. Live – Using Polyscape Pro to Create Next Level Liquid D&B!


2. Ceres – Celestial Voices from Auddict

In our new Kontakt Library Series, we take a look at a range of different and interesting Kontakt libraries, from all kinds of developers – from the biggest players in the business to small studios developing quirky and unusual instruments.

In this video, ADSR’s Stephen Ellestad explore Ceres – Celestial Voices from Auddict, the first release in the Celestial Voices series. Featuring the vocals of acclaimed vocalist Tanya Wells, this instruments offers notes and phrases based on a variety of vocal sounds – oohs, aahs, mmms and more. With a useful set of articulations as well as the distinct phrase shaper module, Ceres allows users to bend in or out of phrases, adding crescendos, mordents and ornaments to vocal parts via a series of keyswitches.

Whether you’re looking for an ethereal voice to float over your production, or need to layer more realistic toplines for your choirs or vocal pads, Ceres is an interesting Kontakt instrument that runs in the retail version of Kontakt 4 or 5.


3. Using Modulation To Control Volume In Kontakt

When you trigger a Kontakt Instrument with midi notes or from a MIDI controller the volume can be varied with velocity. To do this, you use Modulation. In today’s video tutorial, we’ll take a look at Using Modulation To Control Volume.

Kontakt has a variety of parameters that can be modulated and four categories of sources:

-Envelopes
-LFOs
-External Sources
-Others (Step Sequencers, Envelope Followers)

Modulation is a complicated topic and we will dive into in depth in a later tutorial. For today, we will be looking at one of the External Sources, velocity and one of the Envelopes, AHDSR.

Modulation assignments are displayed with a single row in the Modulation Router of the parameter’s parent module. The Modulation Router can be shown by clicking on the button labeled Mod (or Modulation) in the lower left corner of a module.

You can add a new assignment by one of three ways:

1. Right-click on the parameter you want to modulate, then choose a modulation source. The submenu at the bottom of this menu contains modulation sources which already exist in your Instrument and allows you to assign an existing source to more than one parameter.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


4. Automating Kontakt in Logic Pro X Using Smart Controls

In Kontakt, most of the parameters can be automated using the capabilities of your host. Logic Pro X is no exception. And with the new Smart Controls, it couldn’t be easier. In today’s tutorial we will discuss Automating Kontakt In Logic Pro X Using Smart Controls.

Smart Controls let you control the sound of the selected track using a set of onscreen controls. Smart Controls can control both channel strip and plug-in parameters, including software instruments (on software instrument tracks) and effects (on audio, software instrument, and Drummer tracks). Smart Controls provide a quicker alternative to opening plug-in windows and adjusting individual parameters.

Each Smart Control has a set of screen controls. Adjusting a single screen control can change one or more parameters for the track’s channel strip, instrument, and effect plug-ins. Screen controls are labeled to help you understand which aspect of the sound each one affects.

Smart Controls typically include EQ or tone controls, reverb and other effect controls, and controls specific to the type of track or instrument. For example, the Smart Control for a synthesizer might include screen controls for choosing the waveform and adjusting the resonance and filter cutoff, while one for a string instrument might include controls for changing the articulation.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


5. Creating Key and Velocity Crossfades in Kontakt

Crossfades allow your zones to blend into each other across key or velocity. This allows your instrument to be played smoothly and realistically. In today’s video tutorial I will discuss Creating Key and Velocity Crossfades.

When you create Sample sets of tonal instruments that don’t include a Sample for each note, the notes that haven’t been sampled need to derive their signal from the Samples of nearby notes. This is usually done by transposing these Samples upwards or downwards. This method has a downside…the necessary re-sampling process can skew the sound character of your instrument, especially when transposition over a wider note range is required. Consequentially, this means that two consecutive notes on a scale which happen to cross the border between two Zones, and thus are both transposed versions of different Samples, can sound dissimilar.

The same problem can arise with velocity switched Sample sets; suppose you’re using four Samples per note, each assigned to one of four equally large velocity ranges. Especially when you’re sampling an acoustic instrument, it can easily happen that two consecutive notes with only marginally different velocity values still happen to fall into two different velocity ranges, thus resulting in noticeably different timbres.

Crossfades provide a way to counteract these effects. The basic idea is that overlapping your Zones and creating a crossfade between them, thus making them blend into each other within the overlapping parts, will mask the difference in sound for notes that fall between them.

Consider this example…You’re sampling an instrument in minor thirds and have just sampled D and F. You create two Zones out of the Samples and extend them a major second to both sides. Now, Zone 1 covers the key range between C and E, with its root key being D. Zone 2 has its root key on F and covers the key range between D# and G. Notice that the Zones overlap on D# and E, where both will be transposed. Now you create a key crossfade on both Zones; as a result, D# and E notes will play a blend of both Zones, with the D Zone’s Sample being predominant on D# notes, and the F Zone’s Sample being predominant on E notes. Of course, this method works just as well with larger sampling intervals. Just make sure that your Zones overlap in ranges you’d like to be crossfaded, whether in key (horizontal) or velocity (vertical) direction.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


6. Optimize Kontakt DFD

DFD stands for “Direct from Disk” and is a Source Module mode for playing very large Sample sets in real-time without having to load all sample data into RAM. In today’s video tutorial we’ll take a look at how to use and Optimize Kontakt DFD.

DFD stands for “Direct from Disk” and is a Source Module mode for playing very large Sample sets in real-time without having to load all sample data into RAM. When using DFD, only the first part of each sample is loaded into RAM. And when a sample is played the first part is played instantly from RAM while the rest of it is streamed from your hard disk.

Here are a few things you should be aware of when using DFD:
-The maximum number of voices will be lower compared to the Sampler module, because the latency and throughput of your hard disk will be a bottleneck for sampling performance. Of course if using an SSD, the latency and throughput will be minimal if any at all. If you are using a HDD, you can optimize your overall voice count by putting only Groups and Instruments that access very large Samples into DFD mode, while keeping all others in Sampler mode.
-Do not try to use DFD mode with Samples that reside on a CD-ROM. Copy them to hard disk first.
-Although the DFD mode minimizes RAM usage in comparison to the Sampler mode, it still has a noticeable memory footprint, as it needs to pre-load the start of all Samples into memory.
-You can switch between DFD and Sampler mode at any time. However, when switching from DFD to Sampler, there may be a slight pause, as the entire Sample set needs to be loaded into RAM.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


7. Mapping multiple samples and instruments to the keyboard in Kontakt 5

In this Kontakt tutorial, you’ll learn how to use Kontakt’s Key Mapping and Instrument Options to map multiple samples to the keyboard, as well as mapping multiple instruments in the Kontakt Multi.

You’ll also learn how to restrict the keyboard range of a certain instrument, so you can trigger multiple parts or samples from your keyboard at once.


8. Articulations in Kontakt

Are you looking for more control and realism from your strings, winds, or brass instruments in Kontakt?

If so, this is the video for you! In this video, ADSR Instructor Stephen Ellestad shows you the basics of working with articulations in Kontakt.

Topics include using articulation controls and keyswitches, recording separate articulation MIDI tracks and fine tuning the level, dynamic range and attack and release once you’ve created an articulation track.

While this video uses Logic Pro X to demonstrate the concepts, the method and techniques are the same as working in other DAWs, such as Live, Pro Tools, or FL Studio.


9. Wavesfactory Mercury – First Look

In this video, Echo Sound Works walks you through the new piano library for Kontakt, Mercury by Wavesfactory.

Mercury is a grand piano sample library for Kontakt Player featuring a Fazioli F228 recorded at Metropolis Studios in London.

One year in the making, crafting it piece by piece in order to make it perfect in every possible way.


10. Sonic Zest – The Complete Collection – Kontakt Library

In our Kontakt Library Series, we take a look at a range of different and interesting Kontakt libraries, from all kinds of developers – from the biggest players in the business to small studios developing quirky and unusual instruments.

Sonic Zest is a boutique studio that creates a range of interesting and eclectic Kontakt instruments for the retail version (not the free Kontakt Player) of Kontakt 4 or 5. In this video, ADSR’s Stephen Ellestad explores a variety of unique instruments from the Sonic Zest Complete Collection. The instruments are also available as individual instruments or – for some – in a number of smaller bundles, via the Sonic Zest website.

In this tutorial, Stephen demonstrates such instruments as the Acoustic E-Bow, African Tube Percussion, Moroccan hand drums, Himalayan Water Bowls and Vietnamese Lithophones – even an interesting instrument made entirely from the mechanical sounds of an antique typewriter.

Most instruments in the collection include multiple .nki files for different sound design or performance approaches. Sonic Zest’s simple but well-recorded sample instruments are an affordable way to add different libraries and sound elements to your production library.


11. Route a Group To An Aux Channel Using The Gainer Module

Send Effects can route their output to Aux Channels instead of back into the Instrument. But with the Gainer Module, you can send the signal from the Group directly to an Aux Channel. In today’s video tutorial I’ll show you to Route a Group To An Aux Channel Using The Gainer Module.

Send Effects can route their output to Aux Channels instead of back into the Instrument. No news here. But with the Gainer Module, you can send signal from the Group directly to an Aux Channel and optionally out to hardware effects or into your DAW.

Let’s take a look on how you can route a group to an aux channel using the gainer module, routing the aux channel to your DAW, in this case Logic Pro X and then inserting one my my favorite reverb’s, ValhallaRoom. First select the Group you want to route to the aux channel by selecting it in the Group Editor, the Group selector or in the Monitor>Groups tab.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


12. KINETIC TREATS – Kontakt Libraries

Native Instruments is known for its powerful instruments and sound design collaborations with a number of different artists, developers and sound designers.

Kinetic Treats is a new and very interesting creative instrument developed in collaboration with sonic craftsman Jeremiah Savage. In this new Kontakt Instrument, released in December 2016, the instrument itself is based upon the sampled sounds of several classic childrens’ toys, combined with a variety of synthetic sounds in a very unique visual control interface.

In this tutorial, ADSR Instructor Stephen Ellestad walks you through the controls and concept of this interesting and musical Kontakt instrument, explaining the format and ideas behind the unique control system. Along the way, he demonstrates a number of instrument snapshots from each of the three instruments included: TOY ELECTRIC TRAIN, VINTAGE RECORD PLAYER MUSIC BOX and XYLO POLYPHONES.


13. Wavesfactory Suspended Cymbals

In our new Kontakt Library Series, we take a look at a range of different and interesting Kontakt libraries, from all kinds of developers – from the biggest players in the business to small studios developing quirky and unusual instruments.

Waves factory is one of the leaders among the smaller Kontakt developer community, with a number of extremely well done and useful libraries in its catalog – including Shaker instrument Sharine, Drum Circle and the brand new Mercury – a super hi-def sampling of Freddy Mercury’s own classic Fazoli piano in London.

In this video, ADSR’s Stephen Ellestad explores the layout and possibilities of Wavesfactory’s Suspended Cymbals.

Suspended Cymbals features a range of cymbal strikes and impacts – sustains, side sticks, bell impacts and more, along with mod wheel controlled rolls and several effects per cymbal. The cymbals themselves all have multiple mic position and tuning available, and 30 impulse responses allow for extremely natural tonal and spatial shaping from any or all of the sampled cymbals.

With a range of control parameters – selectable round robin, velocity and dampening and a level mixer as well, Wavesfactory’s Suspended Cymbals is a great solution for adding individual cymbal impacts, parts and sounds to your productions.
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14. Output Analog Brass & Winds – First Look

Output Analog Brass & Winds – In this video, Echo Sound Works takes a quick look at the new Kontakt library from Output, Analog Brass & Winds.


15. Tips on Using and Optimizing The Database In Kontakt

The database stores and manages information about all Kontakt related objects in your system. If you don’t keep the database in order it will be slow and difficult to find instruments. In today’s video tutorial we’ll go over tips on using and optimizing the database.

The Database stores and manages information about all Kontakt related objects on your system. It uses metadata to keep track of your files. Native Instrument libraries come pre-tagged with this metadata, but 3rd party and custom content does not. Today i will show you how to add this metadata as well how to use and optimize the database.

BUILDING THE DATABASE

First let’s add a location for Kontakt to index.

In the Browser, Click on the Database Tab. Next click the DB Options button.

In the Database Options, click the Add Button.

Browse to a folder with Instruments, Multis or Banks and click choose.
The contents of the folder have been added to the list of locations the Database will monitor, but it won’t be indexed until the next time Kontakt is opened. To update the database immediately, click the Scan Button. If you have alot of items this may take awhile. When the scan is complete the contents of the new folder will be indexed in the Database.

SEARCHING

Once your Database is populated, you can search the database by any metadata attribute. These include Author, Bank, Timbre, Type and Vendor. The Attribute List works as a filter only displaying results that matches the selected attributes. You can also limit the type of objects in results list by by using the Multi, Bank, Instr, Group, Sample and Preset type switches. Once you have results in the Results List by filtering and searching, simply double-click an entry or drag one or multiple entries to the rack to load it.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


16. Indiginus Solid State Symphony

In our new Kontakt Library Series, we take a look at a range of different and interesting Kontakt libraries, from all kinds of developers – from the biggest players in the business to small studios developing quirky and unusual instruments.

Solid State Symphony from Indiginus Software certainly fits the bill. A velocity switching orchestral instrument built from a broad range of classic hardware and sample waveforms, this unique instrument also offers additional layers of pads, gated pads, motion sequences and more.

In this video, ADSR’s Stephen Ellestad walks through the basic features and functions as he explores the user interface and creative tools inside Solid State Symphony.

With multiple performance modes and an enormous creative potential, Solid State Symphony is an interesting and fun Kontakt instrument for the full version of Kontakt 4 or 5. The full version of SSS also includes Solid State Strings and a streamlined, memory efficient version of the instrument called Q.


17. Use Zone Envelopes To Modulate Zone Parameters in Kontakt

Envelopes provide a flexible way to create adjustable and repeatable modulation patterns. They are typically generated and affect the Group level. Zone Envelopes on the other hand, affect the Zone level. In today’s video tutorial i will show you how to Use Zone Envelopes To Modulate Zone Parameters.

Envelopes provide a flexible way to create adjustable and repeatable modulation patterns. Typically envelopes are generated by envelope generators and affect parameters at the Group level. But with Zone Envelopes you can draw any pattern in perfect sync with your sample and they only affect parameters at the Zone level.

Let’s take a look at how you can Modulate Zone Parameters using Zone Envelopes.

Display the Wave Editor by double clicking on the Zone or selecting the Zone and clicking the Wave Editor button.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


18. Using The Aux Channel To Add Reverb To An Instrument

In Kontakt, each Instrument routes its output to exactly one Output Channel. But you also send this signal to one or multiple Aux Channels with adjustable levels. This allows you to create sub-mixes and route wet effect signals for further processing and even to another physical output. In today’s video tutorial we’ll go over Using The Aux Channel To Add Reverb To An Instrument.

Show the Outputs section by clicking on the Outputs button.

In the first Aux Channel add a Reverb to the first Insert slot.

Double-click on the insert slot to show the effect parameters. Change the parameters to your liking or choose a factory preset. I’ve chosen Bright Room.

Play your instrument and adjust the aux1 slider to add reverb to your liking.
Now let’s take a look at routing wet effect signals to an Aux Channel.
In the Outputs section, the second aux channel and add a Tape Saturator to the first insert slot. Change the parameters to your liking or choose a factory preset. I’ve chosen Warm Distortion High Quality.

Enter edit mode by clicking on the wrench icon of your Instrument.

You can use send effects in the Group Insert, Bus Insert or Instrument Insert effects slots. To use a send effect add the Send Levels module to an effect slot.

Next, scroll down to the Send Effects section and add a Chorus module. Change the parameters to your liking or choose a factory preset. I’ve chosen Guitar Stereo.

Remember to leave a comment to let us know what you think about the video, how you plan on using the techniques you have learned or if want to give us some feedback!


19. Maschine + Kontakt : Live Pitch Shifting

In this video I show how to do live pitch shifting in side of Maschine software using the Kontakt sampling features.


20. Automation With Kontakt

In this video learn how to activate automation inside of any NI Kontakt instrument!


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Top 20+ Kontakt Tutorials 2022
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